These, With Deep Ravines

From “What I Saw in California: Being the Journal of a Tour by the Emigrant Route” by Edwin Bryant, 1847:

The trail here finally leaves the Platte River. Ascending the bluffs on the right, we pursued our way over an arid plain, the only vegetation upon which is the wild sage, grease-wood, and a few perishing plants.

We passed immense piles of rocks, red and black, sometimes in columnar and sometimes in conical and pyramidal shapes, thrown up by volcanic convulsions.

These, with deep ravines, and chasms, and wide-spread sterility and desolation, are the distinguishing features of the landscape.

We reached our camp at a spring impregnated with salt and sulphur, about ten o’clock at night. And emigrant company had made their camp here. In the course of the march we have passed several small lakes or ponds, encrusted with the carbonate of soda or common saleratus. Their appearance resembles congealed water. A few buffaloes have been noticed at a distance during our march. On our right, this afternoon, at a very great distance during our march. On our right, this afternoon, at a very great distance, I observed the summits of several high mountains covered with snow.

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‘These, With Deep Ravines’

Camera: Imperial Savoy (c1956)
Film: Kodak Ektachrome 64X (x-10/1996)
Process: C-41

Avenue of Rocks, Oregon Trail, Wyoming

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